Connecticut Catholic
Public Affairs
Conference
           Representing the Archdiocese of Hartford,
         Diocese of Bridgeport, Diocese of Norwich
         and the Ukrainian Diocese of Stamford
 
 
       134 Farmington Avenue, Hartford, CT 06105      860-524-7882
 

            



 
 
 
 
BISHOPS APPROVE STATEMENT OPPOSING PHYSICIAN-ASSISTED SUICIDE; CALL ON CATHOLICS TO GIVE SUPPORT TO THE DYING, ENSURE THEIR LEGAL PROTECTION
June 16, 2011
 
 To live in a manner worthy of our human dignity, and to spend our final days on this earth in peace and comfort, surrounded by loved ones—that is the hope of each of us. In particular, Christian hope sees these final days as a time to prepare for our eternal destiny.
To Live Each Day with Dignity

 
 
 
 

 


 

 

Physician-Assisted Suicide Legislation Dies in Public Health Committee
Deadline Passes without a Vote on House Bill 5326
 
 
 
The Connecticut Catholic Public Affairs Conference would like to thank all of those who helped defeat this legislation. Thousands of people called or emailed the members of the Public Health Committee, and signed our petition. Your voices were heard.
 
Unfortunately, those supporting this legislation have promised to attempt to have it passed in the 2015 session of the General Assembly. Should this occur, the Conference will once again be calling on your support.  


 


 

Statement of American Medical Society on Physician-Assisted Suicide


 "It is understandable, though tragic, that some patients in extreme duress--such as those suffering from a terminal, painful, debilitating illness--may come to decide that death is preferable to life. However, allowing physicians to participate in assisted suicide would cause more harm than good. Physician-assisted suicide is fundamentally incompatible with the physician’s role as healer, would be difficult or impossible to control, and would pose serious societal risks.

Instead of participating in assisted suicide, physicians must aggressively respond to the needs of patients at the end of life. Patients should not be abandoned once it is determined that cure is impossible. Multidisciplinary interventions should be sought including specialty consultation, hospice care, pastoral support, family counseling, and other modalities. Patients near the end of life must continue to receive emotional support, comfort care, adequate pain control, respect for patient autonomy, and good communication."

Issued June 1994 based on the reports "Decisions Near the End of Life," adopted June 1991, and "Physician-Assisted Suicide," adopted December 1993 (JAMA. 1992; 267: 2229-33); Updated June 1996.